Nokia Unloader Ad



Nokia has declared war on infoxication, and is now offering a therapeutical site where all overburden infoworkers can safely vent their anger at boring documents.

Wouldn’t it be simply wonderful that all those ultra-dull documents, memos and presentations that we force ourselves to read – because they might contain the smallest nugget of useful information (and how disheartening it is to confirm that most of the times they don’t) would just magically disappear, vanishing into thin air as if they’d never existed, thus releasing us from the painstaking job of having to pay attention to them?

Well, Christmas has come earlier this year, because Nokia has just answered your prayers. Now you can bask at the sight of that hateful memo about a project reunion being turned into a lovely ball of fire. Or of the mind-numbing Excel document you just printed being carefully dipped into black paint, rendering it even more useless than it was to begin with. And, best of all, you can do that without loosing your job on the process, or being submitted to compulsive mental evaluation.

Having spotted the emerging trend of infoxication, Nokia is making good use of it, taking the opportunity to connect to consumers on a deep emotional level. The recently launched “Unloader” campaign – created by Swedish agency Fanfar – is very successful at establishing a bond with infoworkers fed up with all the material that’s constantly being thrown at them, but who lack the guts to actually set it on fire (that small matter of unemployment or institutionalization can act as a powerful dissuader).

So if you daydream about shredding all your memos, now you can vent your anger at them in a contained environment. Just go to the Unloader microsite and give free rein to your darkest impulses. It’s OK, since you won’t be destroying the real documents. The downside, of course, is that you won’t be destroying the real documents, so they will still be in your inbox, patiently waiting for you to read them, while gathering more and more friends (they’re very popular).

The beautiful thing is that Nokia, via its mobile phones, is one of the main partners in crime  behind your overburden feeling. Each one of its latest generation Eseries phones (on display on the site) is like a briefcase that fits in your pocket, but has more storage than SportBilly’s bag. And so the heap of documents that you’re supposed to read, that should have read, that can’t go by without reading, just keeps growing and growing.

But that doesn’t really matter when you see the ad, or when you play with the campaign’s site. All that it matters is that Nokia understands your pain. And that will make you much more likely to choose one of its cellphones when you are picking your next generation instrument of enslavement.

The Unloader site is a particular case in point as to the potency of the infoxication trend. Is it silly? You bet! Going through the motion of mock-upload the object of your anger to see a video of it being unmercifully torn to shreds and shot of a canon as a robotic fanfare plays on is about as silly as it can get. But boy, how it puts a smile on your face!

And when you think there’s people actually paying to wreck cars in a junkyard in order to relax, well, then all of a sudden mock-executing PowerPoints doesn’t seem that bad. Doesn’t seem that bad at all.

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1 Response to “Nokia Unloader Ad”


  1. 1 nokia tema January 24, 2009 at 1:00 pm

    thank you…very much 😉


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